Global progressive policing
QUEEN ELIZABETH II:

Policing in the UK and internationally pays tribute to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

OPEN 9th September 2022Policing Insight team

As the UK Royal Family entered a period of mourning following the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday, Policing Insight looks at some of the tributes and messages of condolence that have been sent from the policing family in the UK and overseas.

Police leaders, staff associations and law enforcement stakeholders in the UK and internationally have paid tribute to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, who passed away peacefully at Balmoral on Thursday at the age of 96.

Martin Hewitt, Chair of the National Police Chiefs’ Council, said that it was with “profound sorrow” that the organisation learned of the death of the monarch: “We offer our solemn and sincere condolences to the Royal Family and pay tribute to the life and service of the Queen.

She was and always will be an inspiration to us all, particularly to those of all ages who live with challenging conditions and constantly demonstrate resilience, persevering relentlessly and with a strong sense of duty.”

Simon Nelson, President,
Disabled Police Association

“Police officers take an oath to serve the Queen and the entire police family will join the nation in mourning this very sad news.”

Marc Jones, Chair of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners (APCC), described her passing as a “momentously sad day”, and passed on the “deepest respects and condolences” of PCCs to all members of the Royal Family.

“As our longest-reigning monarch, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II exemplified public service,” said Mr Jones. “For over 70 years she remained a constant source of stability, wisdom, and comfort to the country. She was, and remains, an inspiration to us all.

“Over the coming days, policing will play a key role in ensuring that Her Majesty is laid to rest in a way which befits her life of public service. Police and crime commissioners working with our chief constables will ensure that police forces are able to play a full and active part in supporting our communities and keeping them safe during this important time of national mourning.”

A statement by the Police Federation of England and Wales offered “sincere condolences to the Royal Family” on behalf of its membership as servants of the crown, adding that flags at Federation headquarters had been lowered to half-mast as a mark of respect.

Among the many other tributes from individual officers and policing organisations in the UK was a comment from Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Constabulary Andy Cooke, who praised the Queen’s service “with great distinction and unstinting devotion” during her reign over seven decades.

And Simon Nelson, President of the Disabled Police Association, said it has “always been a privilege” to serve communities on behalf of Her Majesty: “She was and always will be an inspiration to us all, particularly to those of all ages who live with challenging conditions and constantly demonstrate resilience, persevering relentlessly and with a strong sense of duty.

“The Disabled Police Association sends its heartfelt condolences to the Royal Family and pledges to continue with this strong sense of responsibility and commitment to those who need us, as she would have expected and on behalf of the King.”

‘An honour to serve’

The loss of the Queen has also been felt by the wider policing family internationally, particularly for those organisations which have had a closer relationship with the monarchy. Her Majesty was the Commissioner-in-Chief of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), awarding long service medals to members who have completed 20 years’ service, and officially approving a new badge for the RCMP in 1973.

Throughout her reign, the Queen maintained a strong link between the RCMP and The Royal Family. In fact, as Commissioner-in-Chief, Her Late Majesty was the longest serving ‘member’ of the RCMP.”

Brenda Lucki,
RCMP Commissioner

Extending her “sincere condolences” to the Queen’s family, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki Commissioner said: “When the Queen ascended to the throne in 1952, RCMP Commissioner L.H. Nicholson noted her ‘responsible approach to the tasks at hand’ and ‘selfless devotion to duty’.

“Upon her Coronation in 1953, which was attended by a contingent from the RCMP, Her Late Majesty became our Honorary Commissioner. The Queen formally accepted the position of Commissioner-in-Chief during her Diamond Jubilee year – the only time this rank has been conferred in our almost 150-year history.

“Throughout her reign, the Queen maintained a strong link between the RCMP and The Royal Family. In fact, as Commissioner-in-Chief, Her Late Majesty was the longest serving ‘member’ of the RCMP.

“Her Late Majesty’s lifelong commitment to service and duty is a legacy that will continue to inspire us all for many years to come.”

New Zealand Police said that news of the death of Her Majesty marked “a sad and solemn day for New Zealand”, adding: “Not only was the Queen our head of state, she also had a deep connection with our organisation.”

Police forces in Australia have also been paying tribute to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Queensland Police Service Commissioner Katarina Carroll said the Service “joined the world in mourning” the loss of the Queen, stating: “As police we take an oath to serve the Crown with honour and integrity. Her Majesty’s service has inspired us and many Queenslanders alike.

“On behalf of our police community, I extend my deepest condolences to the Royal Family and all those who are feeling her loss. It has been an honour to serve Her Majesty.”


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